[Comp-neuro] CogModel notes: ICCM10/BRIMS11/CogSci10/BICA10/Book/Positions

Frank Ritter frank.ritter at psu.edu
Fri Jul 16 00:31:40 CEST 2010


This is based on the International Cognitive Modeling Conference
mailing list, which I maintain.  I forward messages about twice a
year, a few more close to ICCMs.  (this is the last one for ICCM 2010)

The first two announcements are driving this email, the announcement
of the papers and tutorials.

If you would like to be removed, please just let me know.  I maintain
it by hand to keep it small.  I am trying new software this time to make
it easier to maintain.

cheers,

Frank Ritter                 frank.e.ritter at gmail.com
http://acs.ist.psu.edu       http://www.frankritter.com

1.  ICCM 2010, Program, 5-8 August 2010,  Philadelphia, PA
     http://iccm2010.cs.drexel.edu/AdvanceProgram.pdf
     Proceedings of 2009 available online.

2.  ICCM 2009 Conference Tutorials, 5 August 2010,  Philadelphia, PA
     http://iccm2010.cs.drexel.edu/tutorials.html

3.  BRIMS 2010, proceedings available online
     http://brimsconference.org/archives/2010/toc.htm

4.  BRIMS 2011, 22-25 March 2011 at Sundance, Utah
    http://brimsconference.org/

5.   Cogsci tutorials and workshops
http://cognitivesciencesociety.org/conference2010/tutorials.html
http://cognitivesciencesociety.org/conference2010/workshops.html

6.  Bio. Inspired Cog Arch.  2010 workshop, Wash., DC,  13-14 Nov 2010
    http://roboticslab.dinfo.unipa.it/bica2010/

7.  Multitasking mind book, with 20% discount
http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/Psychology/CognitivePsychology/?view=usa&ci=9780199733569

8.  Post doctoral position(s) at CMU

9.  Post doctoral position at NRL

10.  Opportunities in health care systems engineering at Virginia


***************************************************

1.  ICCM 2009 Conference Program available, 5-8 August 2009,  Philadelphia, PA
     http://iccm2010.cs.drexel.edu/AdvanceProgram.pdf

ICCM is the premier international conference for research on
computational models and computation-based theories of human
behavior. ICCM is a forum for presenting, discussing, and evaluating
the complete spectrum of cognitive models, including connectionism,
symbolic modeling, dynamical systems, Bayesian modeling, and cognitive
architectures. ICCM includes basic and applied research, across a wide
variety of domains, ranging from low-level perception and attention to
higher-level problem-solving and learning.

The proceedings of the 2007 conference are available from
http://sitemaker.umich.edu/iccm2007.org/iccm_2007_proceedings_and_papers

A copy of proceedings of the 2009 conference are available from
http://acs.ist.psu.edu/papers/iccm2009.pdf

***************************************************

2.  ICCM 2009 Conference Tutorials, 5 August 2010,  Philadelphia, PA
     http://iccm2010.cs.drexel.edu/tutorials.html

The CLARION Cognitive Architecture: A Tutorial
Half-day tutorial (0900-1215)

Nicholas Wilson, Cognitive Science Dept.
Michael Lynch, Dept. of Language, Literature and Communication, RPI

This tutorial introduces participants to the CLARION cognitive
architecture and presents a detailed description, as well as
simulation examples, advanced topics, and demonstrations. It will
combine conceptual (psychological), theoretical, and implementation
aspects of the architecture. Both basic and advanced topics related to
cognitive modeling using CLARION will be covered. Participants in the
tutorial are encouraged to ask questions throughout the presentation
to clarify any ideas described.

====================
Multi-Agent Activity Modeling with the Brahms Environment
Half-day tutorial (1345-1700)

Maarten Sierhuis, Ph.D.
PARC

More and more people are interested in in developing "day in the life"
models and simulations of people's behavior at the second and longer
timeframe, the interaction between groups of people and systems, as
well as the movement and interaction with the environment. Cognitive
modeling tools (e.g., Soar, ACT-R) focus on detailed modeling of
individual cognitive tasks at the sub-second level. In contrast,
activity modeling focuses on higher-abstraction behaviors that enable
modeling of people's daily activities and enable a focus on how
informal, circumstantial, and located behaviors of a group of
individuals occur and where communication and synchronization happen,
such that the task contributions of people and machines flow together
to accomplish goals. This is referred to as "work practice modeling."
The tutorial will provide an overview of the Brahms multi-agent
activity modeling language by considering a simple 'day in the life'
scenario. There will be hands-on experience with Brahms.

Brahms includes an activity-oriented Belief-Desire-Intention (BDI)
language, a compiler and virtual machine for executing Brahms models,
as well as an Eclipse plug-in and a post-execution viewer of agent
execution, communication and interaction. Brahms enables the creation
of multi-agent models that include aspects of reasoning found in
cognitive models, task execution, plus the impact of interaction and
geography, such as agent movement and physical changes in the
environment. Brahms is currently used to automate the work of a flight
controller in NASA's International Space Station's Mission Control
Center (ISS MCC). This system, called OCAMS, has been in production in
the ISS MCC, 24x7, since July of 2008, and is based on a Brahms model
of the work practices of the flight controllers. OCAMS is a
distributed Multi-Agent System.

Maarten Sierhuis recently joined PARC as area lead for the new
Knowledge, Language and Interaction area. Before this, he was at NASA
Ames for over twelve years, working on and applying Brahms at NASA. He
is a Co-Principal Investigator for the Brahms multi-agent
environment. He is also a visiting professor at the Man-Machine
Interaction group at Delft University of Technology, where he teaches
a graduate course using Brahms, called Agent-Based Modeling and
Simulation of Organizations and Work Practice. He has a Ph.D. in
Social Science Informatics from the University of Amsterdam and an
engineering degree in Informatics from the Polytechnic University in
The Hague, The Netherlands. He has presented invited lectures and
tutorials on both Brahms and Compendium, and has published widely in
these areas.

******************************************************************

3.  BRIMS 2010, proceedings available
     http://www.brimsconference.org

The proceedings from last year's conference is available at:
http://brimsconference.org/archives/2010/toc.htm

BRIMS (Behavior Representation in Modeling Simulation) enables human
behavior representation (HBR) modeling and simulation research
scientists, engineers, application users and technical communities to
meet, share ideas and experiences, identify gaps in current
capabilities, discuss new research directions, highlight promising
technologies, and showcase applications. It is in its 20th year and
continues to reach an ever widening military, government, academic,
and industry community in the U.S. and internationally.

******************************************************************

4.  BRIMS 2011, 22-25 at Sundance Utah
    http://brimsconference.org/

The 20th Behavior Representation in Modeling & Simulation (BRIMS)
Conference 2011 will be held March 21-24, 2011 at the Sundance Resort
in Utah.

***************************************************

5.   Cogsci tutorials and workshops

http://cognitivesciencesociety.org/conference2010/tutorials.html

The tutorial program of the conference allows participants to gain new
insights, knowledge, and skills from a broad range of topics in the
field of cognitive science. Tutorials cover a well-established and
recognized topic in cognitive science, and are delivered by an
authoritative figure in the area. Tutorials are held on Wednesday,
August 11, 2010, which is the day before the main program begins.

http://cognitivesciencesociety.org/conference2010/workshops.html

The conference workshop program gives an opportunity for in-depth
discussion of a specific topic important to cognitive
science. Workshops concentrate on emerging research or
cross-disciplinary topics. Some workshops also focus on application
issues and research methods. Workshops are held on Wednesday, August
11, 2010, which is the day before the main program begins.

***************************************************

6.  Bio. Inspired Cog Arch.  2010 workshop, Wash., DC, 13-14 Nov 2010
    http://roboticslab.dinfo.unipa.it/bica2010/

This workshop is still accepting abstracts and some papers.
Contact Alexei Samsonovich <asamsono at gmu.edu> if you would like to contribute.

The challenge of creating a real-life computational equivalent of the
human mind requires that we better understand at a computational level
how natural intelligent systems develop their cognitive and learning
functions. In recent years, biologically inspired cognitive
architectures (BICA) have emerged as a powerful new approach toward
gaining this kind of understanding (here "biologically inspired" is
understood broadly as "brain-mind inspired").

Still, despite impressive successes and growing interest in BICA, wide
gaps separate different approaches from each other and from solutions
found in biology, preventing us from solving the challenge.

The narrow focus on the challenge brings together four schools of thought:

(1) computational neuroscience, that tries to understand how the brain
    works in terms of connectionist models;

(2) cognitive modeling, pursuing higher-level computational
    description of human cognition;

(3) human-level artificial intelligence, aiming at generally
    intelligent artifacts that can replace humans at work;

(4) human-like learners: artificial minds that can be understood by
    humans intuitively, that can learn like humans, from humans and
    for human needs.

The comparative table created by panelists of the BICA 2009 forum
clearly demonstrates that a joined discussion of the four schools is
possible and can be highly productive and synergistic
(http://members.cox.net/bica2009/cogarch/). The intended spotlight in
2010 is on (4).

***************************************************

7.  Multitasking mind [book] with 20% discount
http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/Psychology/CognitivePsychology/?view=usa&ci=9780199733569

For 20% off, visit http://www.oup.com/us and enter promo code 29051.

Multitasking is all around us: the office worker interrupted by a
phone call, the teenager texting while driving, the salesperson
chatting while entering an order. When multitasking, the mind juggles
all the many tasks we're doing this second, this hour, this week, and
tries to perform them together-sometimes with great ease, sometimes
with great difficulty. We don't often stop to think about how exactly
we accomplish these feats of multitasking great and small. How do we
switch from one task to another? What types of multitasking are
disruptive, and when are they most disruptive? And ultimately, how can
we take advantage of the benefits of multitasking while alleviating
its negative effects in our daily lives?

This book presents the theory of threaded cognition, a theory that
aims to explain the multitasking mind. The theory states that
multitasking behavior can be expressed as cognitive
threads-independent streams of thought that weave through the mind's
processing resources to produce multitasking behavior, and sometimes
experience conflicts to produce multitasking interference. Grounded in
the ACT-R cognitive architecture, threaded cognition incorporates
computational representations and mechanisms used to simulate and
predict multitasking behavior and performance.

The book describes the implications of threaded cognition theory
across three traditionally disparate domains: concurrent multitasking
(doing multiple tasks at once), sequential multitasking (interrupting
and resuming tasks), and multitask skill acquisition (learning and
practicing multiple tasks). The work stresses the importance of
unifying basic and applied research by alternating between in-depth
descriptions of basic research phenomena and broader treatments of
phenomena in applied domains, such as driver distraction and
human-computer interaction. The book also includes practical
guidelines for designers of interactive systems intended for
multitasking contexts.

***************************************************

8.  Post-doctoral position(s) at CMU
    [sent to act-r mailing list 6 june 2010, may be out of date]

Applications are welcome for research positions in the Psychology
Department at Carnegie Mellon University under the direction of
Dr. Christian Lebiere.  Positions include two postdoctoral researchers
and a research programmer.

The goals of the projects are to investigate the application of hybrid
cognitive architectures consisting of symbolic, statistical and neural
processes and representations to robotic control systems.  The
projects are funded by multi-year grants from the Army Research
Laboratories (ARL) and the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency
(DARPA).

Specific areas of interest include but are not limited to: 1)
Integrating symbolic and neural cognitive architectures. 2)
Integrating symbolic reasoning and statistical learning processes. 3)
Applying hybrid cognitive architectures to robotic control problems
including autonomy and mixed human-robot teams. 4) Applying cognitive
architectures to human-robot interaction problems including operator
situation awareness and human-guided learning in robots. 5)
Integrating computational and cognitive techniques for understanding
complex visual scenes.

Postdoctoral candidates should have a doctorate in cognitive
psychology, cognitive science, computer science, or robotics, with a
background in computational modeling and a strong interest in both
basic research in cognitive science and its practical
applications. Research programmer candidates should have a BS in
computer science (MS preferred) or equivalent experience, with a
background in modeling and simulation preferred.  All candidates
should submit their CV to the address below, and postdoctoral
candidates should also include a letter describing their research
interests and goals, and at least 2 letters of recommendation.

These positions are open immediately and offer competitive salary and
benefits.  Carnegie Mellon University offers a stimulating research
environment in livable Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  To apply or obtain
additional information, contact:

Dr. Christian Lebiere
Psychology Department
Carnegie Mellon University
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Tel: 412-268-6028
Email: cl at cmu.edu

******************************************************************

9.  Post-doctoral position at NRL

Greg Trafton (trafton at itd.nrl.navy.mil) at the Navy Research Lab may
have openings for a post-doctoral researcher.  Please contact him
directly.

***************************************************

10.  Opportunities in health care systems engineering at Virginia for
        postdoctoral research fellows, Ph.D. graduate study, and
        short-term mentored research at the University of Virginia

    [from Ellen J. Bass <ejb4n at virginia.edu>]

The Department of Systems and Information Engineering at the
University of Virginia is seeking applications to fill two positions
in each of the following categories: Ph.D. graduate study,
postdoctoral research fellow and short-term mentored research
experience, all in the area of healthcare systems engineering. See
below for details on each of these opportunities.

1. Predoctoral:

The Department of Systems and Information Engineering at the
University of Virginia is seeking applications for Ph.D. graduate
study in the area of healthcare systems engineering. Two candidates
are sought to conduct research toward the development modeling and
simulation tools to support human-automation interaction in the
healthcare domain. This research is part of a multi-year training
program that draws together researchers with expertise in systems
engineering (formal methods, control theory, algorithm development,
human factors engineering, haptics, modeling, simulation and
training), with mentors in the healthcare field (including pediatrics,
internal medicine, urology, emergency medicine, diabetes, cancer,
global health, and nursing). Candidates are expected to complete all
Ph.D. degree requirements, including graduate coursework and the
successful completion of a set of mentored Ph.D. research
activities. The bulk of the candidate's funding is supported by a
grant from the National Library of Medicine with supplemental funding
from a number of additional sources.

Minimum requirements: The applicant must have received their B.S. in
systems engineering, industrial engineering, computer science,
computer engineering, cognitive science, or a closely related
discipline and be a US citizen or permanent resident. The ideal
candidates will also have a M.S. in one of the previous fields, strong
software development skills, excellent writing skills, and a
demonstrated ability to participate in interdisciplinary
collaborations. The initial appointment will be for one year with the
option to renew for four additional years.

Annual Stipend: $21,180 plus $2000/year travel support, full tuition,
and health insurance coverage.

Review of applications will begin in July 2010 and will continue until
the positions are filled, likely starting date in Fall 2010 or Spring
2011. Interested candidates should fill out the Department of Systems
and Information Engineering pre-application form. However, official
candidates must apply through the regular graduate engineering
admission process for the Department of Systems and Information
Engineering (found here) and should clearly indicate their desire to
participate in this medical informatics training program in their
essay. Applicants must complete a Candidate Profile on-line and attach
a statement of interest and description of past research experience
(if applicable), GRE scores, transcript(s) from the candidate's
institution granting their degree(s), and three references who are
familiar with the candidate's aptitude for or experiences in research.


2. Postdoctoral:

The Department of Systems and Information Engineering at the
University of Virginia is seeking applications for postdoctoral
research scientists in the area of healthcare systems engineering. Two
candidates are sought to conduct research toward the development
modeling and simulation tools to support human-automation interaction
in the healthcare domain. This research is part of a multi-year
training program that draws together researchers with expertise in
systems engineering (formal methods, control theory, algorithm
development, human factors engineering, haptics, modeling, simulation
and training), with mentors in the healthcare field (including
pediatrics, internal medicine, urology, emergency medicine, diabetes,
cancer, global health, and nursing). Candidates are expected to
conduct mentored research and have the option to take graduate
coursework as applicable or to teach courses or modules in their area
of expertise. The bulk of the candidate's funding is supported by a
grant from the National Library of Medicine (Stephanie Guerlain, PI),
with supplemental funding from a number of additional sources.

Minimum requirements: The applicant must have received their Ph.D. in
systems engineering, industrial engineering, computer science,
computer engineering, cognitive science, or a closely related
discipline (or have an M.D. or Ph.D. in a healthcare-related field
with a strong aptitude for engineering) and be a US citizen or
permanent resident. The ideal candidates will also have a demonstrated
track record in research, strong software development skills,
excellent writing skills, and the ability to participate in
interdisciplinary collaborations. The initial appointment will be for
one year with the option to renew for two additional years.

Salary: Competitive, based on qualifications and experience. Includes
a travel stipend, full tuition (as applicable), and health insurance
coverage.

Review of applications will begin in July 2010 and will continue until
the positions are filled, likely starting date in Fall 2010 or Spring
2011. Interested candidates should send a CV along with a statement of
interest and description of past research experience, transcript(s),
and three references who are familiar with the candidate's aptitude
and experience in conducting research.


3. Short-term:

The Department of Systems and Information Engineering at the
University of Virginia is seeking applications for short-term (three
months, full-time) research internships in the area of healthcare
systems engineering. Two candidates from under-served populations are
sought to conduct mentored research to support human-automation
interaction in the healthcare domain. This opportunity is part of a
multi-year training program that draws together researchers with
expertise in systems engineering (formal methods, control theory,
algorithm development, human factors engineering, haptics, modeling,
simulation and training), with mentors in the healthcare field
(including pediatrics, internal medicine, urology, emergency medicine,
diabetes, cancer, global health, and nursing). Candidates are expected
to conduct mentored research and have the option to take a course as
part of their training. These positions are supported by a grant from
the National Library of Medicine, with supplemental funding from a
number of additional sources.

Minimum requirements: The applicant must be enrolled in or have
received their bachelor's, master's, or doctoral degree in systems
engineering, industrial engineering, computer science, computer
engineering, cognitive science, medicine, nursing, or a closely
related discipline and be a US citizen or permanent resident from an
underserved population (African American, Hispanic, American Indian,
Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander). The ideal
candidates will also have software development skills, excellent
communication skills, and the ability to participate in
interdisciplinary collaborations. The length of appointment is for
three months.

Salary: $5,295. Includes tuition to take one course (as applicable).

Review of applications will begin in July 2010 and will continue until
the positions are filled. Interested candidates should fill out the
Department of Systems and Information Engineering pre-application form
and should clearly indicate their desire to participate in this
short-term medical informatics training program in their
essay. Applicants must attach a statement of interest and description
of past research experience (if applicable), transcript(s), and the
names, email addresses, and title of three references who are familiar
with the candidate's aptitude for or experiences in research.

For further information regarding these positions, please contact:

Ellen J. Bass
Department of Systems and Information Engineering
P.O. Box 400747
151 Engineer's Way
Charlottesville, VA 22904
434-243-5531
http://www.sys.virginia.edu/ejb/
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